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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
us also, artist chuck close, jeff koons and john currin. >> i would think andy's cultural influences are also part of my cultural influences. think that i've always been in awe of his existentialism. of -- just this going from desharp of indifference to acceptance where it's so outward and at the same time we're dealing with the self. and the power of that existentialism. >> he kicked open the door-- along with alex katz and a couple of other people-- for an intelligent, forward-looking, modern portrait. most people who were working with imagery were trying to breathe new life into 19th century issues. and he came along and said "we're going to make this of an entirely different order." >> with someone of the statue of warhol, there's also a kind of oedipal path where even if you move away from him you will end up meeting him and sort of finding that you do live in his world. >> rose: also this evening, a rebroad cast of our conversation with damian hirst. >> i think without andy warhol i wouldn't have gone so gung-ho. but people say "oh, my god, you've got factory." and you think f
: andy warhol, jeff koons chuck close, john currin and damien hirst when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: andy warhol is considered by many to be the most important artist of the 21st century, though critics and artist debate the meaning of his work, few question his impact on contemporary art. this is the subject of of the metropolitan musician exhibition called "regarding warhol: 60 artists, 50 years." it showcases 45 works by warhol alongside 1200 works by 60 other artists influenced by him. joining me are two curators, mark rosenthal and marla prather. also are three of the artists featured in the show: jeff koons john currin and my good friend chuck close. i'm pleased to have all of them here at this table. let me start with you, mark. somebody once said to me great books begin with a question. do great exhibitions begin with a question? >> well, that's what i hope. the question here is, is andy warhol the most impactful artist? >> rose: impactful rather than important? >> i prefer that
: jeff immelt for the hour. next. >> rose: general electric is the nation's largest industrial company. it employs over 300,000 people around the world. it makes everything from aircraft engines to power plant turbines to medical imaging equipment. the company has evolved over the last decade over jeff immeant's watch. he has led a global expansion and shed once treasured businesses such as plastics and insurance. in 2011, president obama named him to lead the council on jobs and competitiveness. last month, the country created 146,000 jobs, exceeding expectations in the wake of hurricane sandy. further progress will be tested as the fiscal cliff deadline approaches without a deal inside yet. i'm very pleased to have jeff immelt back on this program. welcome >> charlie, thanks, good to be back with you. >> rose: we've talked many times about g.e. since you took over, i think once since -- just after 2001. where is the company today in terms of where do you want it to be and where do you want it to be in the next five years? >> i think, charlie, what we've tried to do is simplify the po
what you do? >> yeah. on days like this, yeah, i do. >> thanks, jeff. hey, get my friend a beer as well. one of those fancy imported ones. >> sure. maybe like a granola bar to go with it. >> you know what it takes, steve? >> huh? >> do you have what it takes? >> oh, to be you? yeah. absolutely. >> huh? >> you just might. >> and i will drink to that. >> hey, there she is. ready to go? >> yeah. all right. hey, thanks for the beer, that was really sweet. >> i hope you guys have a great night. thanks, jessica. >> i am really looking forward to tomorrow. >> should be fun. >> yeah. >> rose: if he says this movie is about a modern day american identity, what do you say it is about? >> i always think of it as a kind of movie that i was used to seeing in the sixties where it is sort of a story about corporate shenanigans or corporate manipulation. >> rose: does it remind you of any of those movies? >> one is mirage, with gregory peck, i remember that one. >> rose: yeah. >> which the story occurred during the blackout of 65 or 64. which is a great movie. where the corporate heads are afraid that
mission is to tell louisiana's story to the world. jeff blackwell: chef's start your burners,
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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